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Gone running

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About Gone running

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  1. Hi, my name is Becky and I am a structural bodyworker. Over the 17 years I've been in business, I have helped lots of runners recover from their injuries and chronic conditions. The one question that kept popping up in my mind was, "Why would they want to do that anyway? It hurts". One of my clients told me about the book, Born to Run and I read that. Looking at the body from that physiological standpoint and realizing that indeed, I had no idea how to run correctly, I thought perhaps I had missed the boat and I should give it one more shot. In the years since then, I've tried it several different times and realized that it was not as painful as I thought if I was running without a ton of heel strike. Also, as the compensations my body had developed from who knows how many injuries growing up cleared up, it became easier for me to run. So here I am, trying to become a runner at age 49.
  2. I have been a structural bodyworker since 2001 and I help runners with this all the time. First, know that the problem starts in the low back, S1 nerve root. The piriformis stretches such as the pigeon pose or a modification of it, are important to do daily. Second, make sure to stretch the hamstrings, keeping the back straight and hinging at the hip/groin. I always recommend stretching the hammies while you brush your teeth. Third, stretch the calves, both straight and bent legs. Lastly, see a good bodyworker who understands how the foot is supposed to work and can help normalize the arch. I have had clients with PF who have had both almost no arch and those that had a supinated arch. Both are malfunctions of the arch. The healthiest thing for you as a runner, is to fix your arch, not just give it a crutch long term.
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