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danpincus

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Posts posted by danpincus

  1. Hello

    I completed the program two years ago and then fell fell off. I’m starting again, having lost some weight and gained terrifically proved blood numbers by following  a Real Food/LCHF diet. I’m looking forward to building up to a 5K, being in much better shape to start with than last time. 

  2. I like to keep it regular, as in, on the same days.  So, Monday, Wednesday, Saturday.  That way, each run has a day or two of rest afterwards and the calorie burn is spaced out over seven days.  Especially because I do Zen Lab calisthenics apps on my running days, the days intervening are rest days.  On the rest days, I try to walk at least 10,000 steps.    

  3. When you get back to the program, this non-MD C25K graduate encourages you to not jog at all, but just walk faster for the running segments.  Until your weight drops a bit, jogging just might be too stressful on your lower body. If you are in this for the long haul, take it easy.  By eliminating ALL bread, rice, potatoes, grains, and sugar for a few weeks, my body was able to drop several pounds.  I felt lighter, and the jogging was easier. In it for the long haul.  All those goodies can return, some time.    

  4. I also was puzzled by that reversion to some walking, but it seems like a strategy of pacing.  Just keep trying to make your distance match the time.  Also, there is no law against varying the speed of your running.  Making more and smaller steps up hills is a standard technique.  Also, an occasional sprint can feel remarkably doable and helpful to your technique and pace.  I am a graduate and amazed at how well I am doing now in 2.8 mile runs and 5Ks.  

  5. I agree with the preceding post.  It takes a long as it takes.  with a history of asthma, it's gping to be different for you.  What you are doing is great...you are engaging with the program.  I wouldn't be surprised if your stamina and muscle tone is not changing for the better.  Your eventual success and victory will be al the sweeter for all the effort you will have put in.

     

    Keep it up.  And do consult with your doctor.   

  6. One more thing about fartlek.  The reason it works so well to build endurance has to do the body mechanics of speeding up and slowing down.  Both of those efforts engage the muscles more deeply than a steady effort.  More muscle engagement, the more calories burned, and the stronger they become.  That's why soccer players are so awesomely sleek...running speed in soccer is always changing.  

  7. Anyone reading your post is happy to read that you can job for 3 minutes straight.   After being a couch potato, that's big progress.  Really.

     

    However, prudence is called for.  We are have heard the statement:  consult your doctor before embarking on this exercise program.  Did you do that?  

     

    How's your BMI?  

     

    You might try doing some fartleks. That Swedish word for "Speed Play" is the worst word in the English vocabulary.  However, don't let that get in your way.  Use it.  All it means is varying your speed.  Try something like this when in the jogging phase.  
    Jog for 20 paces (two foot fallls is a pace),

    10 paces a bit faster,

    and 5 paces faster still.  When you run fast, be SURE to slow down  slowly.  Not doing that can stress your hamstrings, as happened to me.    

     

    After a few rounds of that, I go back to normal jogging.  Then, I do it in palindrome order: Jog, Faster,, Sprint, Slower, Jog.   

    Jog, Faster, Spring, Slower, Jog.    

     

    If you try this, let us know how it goes.

     

    Good luck.  Prudence.  

  8. I started back in March, but stopped after a few weeks.  I resumed in May and, last week, finished 8/3.  

     

    Yesterday, was my first 5K in the New York Road Runners Summer Classic in Fresh Meadows Park, Queens.  I quickly found a partner and we talked and kept each other focused.  I initiated some fartleks of jogging slowly, jogging faster and sprinting in 20/10/5 paces rhythm.  42:19 in 90 degree heat ain't bad.  Best of all, I sprinted across the finish line and five minutes later, felt fine.  With that I knew that the app really helped prepare me, slowly, to be able to do that.  I used the app not to attain the 5k in 30 minutes, but to be able to jog for 30 minutes without stopping.  Now, my plan is to train for speed and come in under 30 minutes within a few months.  The feeling of this 62 year old man sprinting across the finish line - golden.  Along the way, the Fitness apps bundle helped strengthen all over.  

  9. I am 62, male.  When I finish the program this week, I will be able to run for 30 minutes, but not 5k.  That will come later.  Once I establish my baseline aerobic capacity, it will be time to amp up the speed/distance.  I am looking forward to being able to push towards 5k in 30 minutes, and then at better and better time.  

  10. Hi,  

     

    I am 62 and live in Manhattan.  I have had to repeat some days, not weeks.  This happens also in the Pushups App.  If I am close to the goal, but cannot finish it, I repeat the day until I can.  Maybe that can work for you.  Also, varying the pace of the jog may help.  My strong hunch is that each of has a "normal" pace, a pace that should be exceeded occasionally to jump start a higher speed or endurance.  Finally, I have learned that good jogging form requires the arms to move to and fro.  Poor form cuts down on pace and endurance.  

     

    Good luck in your quest.  On Friday morning, I start week 8.  Oh...I focus not on distance, but time.  For me, this app is helping me achieve my baseline aerobic endurance, which is 30 minutes of continuous jogging.  Distance will come later. 

  11. Something someone wrote today about the transition from 3:3 to 4:1 made me go back and look at the walk and jog times.  Jogging in 3:3 is in 90 secs, 3 minutes, and 3 minutes, while in 4:1 it's in 5, 3, and 5 minute segments.  I wonder why the first jog segment in 4:1 is not 2, 3 or 4.  A two minute increase seems like a lot.       

  12. Nice going.  I know the feeling.  This program is quite amazing.

     

    I added the Squats and Pushup apps by this company and have found them very helpful.  What I really found was how atrophied my leg and butt muscles had become.  Running is much, much easier with those muscles all fired up.  Note, I do them after a run on the same day and then rest one or two days.  My last session day was Monday.  But, then today, I felt like running again, and after only one day of rest,  it went fine.  Even on rest days, I try to walk 10,000 steps.   We need to listen to our bodies and figure out what they're telling us.  

  13. You are doing it right by alternating walking with faster walking,  Do nothing that hurts.  Nothing.  When you drop some weight, you may feel the urge to jog.  Jog then, not before.  The G force impact of even light jogging is so great that injury can easily occur.  You want to be more fit and enjoy moving around more, not being confined to a chair or bed.  Take it slow, and find an effective weight loss program.  I use the system devised by Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital:

     

    http://www.bidmc.org/YourHealth/BIDMCInteractive/Break-Through-Your-Set-Point.aspx

     

    If you use it, let us know about your progress.  

  14. I agree with the previous reply. The numbers speak for themselves. Let's face it: were talking about our leg muscles. Anything you can do to strengthen your legs will help. I use the Zen Labs 200 squats app to great effect.  I tried doing the squats on days between runs, but then felt tired all the time.  Now, they are part of my running day routine, after running, and I take off one or two days afterwards.  On those resting days, I really watch what I eat.  The first time I did it that way, the next run went quite well.  The long and short of it is that we have to be clever and try different combinations and approaches.  What matters most is that the running sessions not be awful and painful.  It should feel like effort, but not so strenuous as to rob you of fun and of the desire to continue.   

  15. One more thing. They say that we should be able to have a conversation while running. In other words, we should go slowly enough to be able to do it. If you don't run with someone, you can either talk to yourself for memorize some poem for a speech and recite it while you're going. I do this myself, believe it or not I have committed several Shakespeare sonnets to memory and recite them while I'm jogging. Next stop is the Gettysburg address. Anything that can distract you is good.

  16. Let's check some details. How tired are you before you run? What do you eat before you run? We all need to keep in mind that we are not robots I am sure a significant number of people have had to repeat a week here and there, and perhaps even more than that. If you do not feel ready to rip when you begin, try to figure out why. Without that bounce in your step come it's going to be difficult.

  17. Hi,

     

    I am in Week 6 and tomorrow is week 3.  I go out in the morning and eat a full breakfast a 1/2 hour before.  I start slowly, on both the walk and run phases.  In the running phase, it take small steps, smaller than usual, just to feel comfortable.  The time you spend running is more important than the distance.  If you work out a bit afterwards, all the better.  I bought the four app package and do everything except the pullups.  Hang in there.     

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